Extraordinary event is coming to the grounds of Compton Verney this weekend involving music, dance and huge orbs on water

As the spectacle develops, musicians playing unusual instruments from around the world can be seen and heard under a large, sculptural canopy

Wednesday, 19th August 2020, 3:01 pm
Extraordinary event is coming to the grounds of Compton Verney this weekend involving music, dance and huge orbs on water.
Extraordinary event is coming to the grounds of Compton Verney this weekend involving music, dance and huge orbs on water.

An extraordinary new event is coming to the grounds of Compton Verney Art Gallery and Park this weekend (Sunday August 23).

'Music of the Spheres – Story of Water' features dancers and musicians performing in transparent, land-based orbs which move around the audience.

As the spectacle develops, musicians playing unusual instruments from around the world can be seen and heard under a large, sculptural canopy.

Extraordinary event is coming to the grounds of Compton Verney this weekend involving music, dance and huge orbs on water.

Musicians performing the 45-minute set include Michael Ormiston, one of Europe’s leading exponents of Mongolian overtone – or throat - singing.

Michael will also play Tibetan singing bowls, a Mongolian horsehead fiddle and a wide range of other instruments from the Far East.

Joining him in this part of the show is Steve Wishart, a composer who specialises in creating performances on the hurdy gurdy.

The concluding part of the staged show is a performance by the duo of Sylvia Hallett and Mike Adcock. They perform on violin, accordian and percussion plus more uncommon instruments, including a slate xylophone and amplified bicycle wheel.

The finale of Music of the Spheres is Water Cycle, composed and played by Simon Desorgher on the flute.

The musical performance will be accompanied by dancers who, like Simon and Lawrence, will appear within a number of giant spheres and domes.

The size of a four-storey building, the largest sphere will create a showpiece moment as aerial dancer Claire Crook, spins and spirals inside the enormous zorb-like ball, with silks suspended from its centre, while rolling across Compton Verney’s lake.