Telling an historic bloody tale

Battle of Edgehill exhibition Project Manager Brian Douthwaite and management group members Puffin Pocock and Rachel Mander inside St Peter's Church in Radway.'MHLC-16-10-13 Radway battle Oct57
Battle of Edgehill exhibition Project Manager Brian Douthwaite and management group members Puffin Pocock and Rachel Mander inside St Peter's Church in Radway.'MHLC-16-10-13 Radway battle Oct57

The first battle of the English Civil War will be brought to life thanks to more than £70,000 from the National Lottery.

An information exhibition and project based in St Peter’s church, Radway, will tell the story of the Battle of Edgehill.

Called The Battle of Edgehill Information Hub, the volunteer-lead group has been given £71,800 from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF).

Brian Douthwaite, project manager, said: “We are thrilled to have received the support 
of the HLF and are confident that the project will provide much needed information for visitors.

“We have received widespread support, both from individuals with an interest in history and the social aspects of the battle, the Kineton History Group, Battlefields Trust and local schools who see it as providing material for their school curriculum.”

The project has to be completed by June 2015 and when the hub is open, it will tell the story of the Battle of Edgehill in a variety of interactive ways.

There will be a film of actors in period costume which will provide a touch screen introduction; the story of the battle and the effect on the local people will be provided; life-size dummies will be dressed in period costume and artefacts displayed in museum-style cabinets.

There will also be a website run in tandem with the hub.

Mr Douthwaite said: “We want to provide information that is informative and acceptable to all ages.

“Our information will not only be about the battle, but also the social history of the area and the effect on the area – both armies pillaged and took things from people..

“It was the end of October, so a lot of the food would have been stored to help them through the winter.”