Historic Warwick landmark gets support for restoration project

One of Warwick’s landmarks has received support for a project to help restore and revive its 700-year-old buildings.

The Lord Leycester Hospital, which is in High Street, has received initial support from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) for “Project Seven Centuries of Midlands Civic Heritage”.

Brother Gordon, Heidi Meyer, Sheila Bradshaw, Events Manager, and Brother John who lives at the hospital. Photo by Gill Fletcher.

Brother Gordon, Heidi Meyer, Sheila Bradshaw, Events Manager, and Brother John who lives at the hospital. Photo by Gill Fletcher.

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The project aims to restore the fabric of the historic buildings that are currently open to the public; reveal new areas never publicly seen before including the medieval wall of Warwick, and create a modern exhibition facility to tell the stories of seven centuries of Warwick civic and philanthropic life to new audiences of all ages.

Development funding of more than £200,000 been awarded to help the Lord Leycester Hospital progress its plans to apply for a full grant at a later date.

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Heidi Meyer, Master of the Lord Leycester Hospital, said “Our vision is a revitalised historic icon in the centre of Warwick reconnected to its community more than ever before, making it relevant to new communities and contemporary town life.

“We are grateful to the Heritage Lottery Fund for opening the doors for us to start this work.”

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A revitalised Lord Leycester Hospital will offer a unique visitor experience that gives the visitor a glimpse into the life and community of medieval guilds and then later as a hospital created by Lord Dudley, Earl of Leycester, as a home and place of sanctuary for wounded warriors of the Elizabethan age.

Four hundred and fifty years later the mission of the Lord Leycester is unchanged as sanctuary is given to young soldiers who fought in modern wars and older soldiers.

It is Warwickshire’s equivalent of the Royal Hospital Chelsea.