Final version of Kenilworth Neighbourhood Plan published

The final draft of the Kenilworth Neighbouhood Plan has now been published
The final draft of the Kenilworth Neighbouhood Plan has now been published

The final version of the Kenilworth Neighbourhood Plan, which could help influence development in the town for several years, has now been published.

Many of the plan's policies have been rewritten after a lengthy consultation period. The large number of responses received meant the plan's redrafting took a long time.

But Kenilworth Town Council hopes it will be able to send off the plan for Warwick District Council's approval after a public meeting on Thursday March 15 in Jubilee House, starting at 7pm.

In a statement on the Kenilworth Web website, Cllr George Illingworth said: "I am delighted to say that we are now moving forward with the Neighbourhood Plan.

"It has been greatly modified, and we hope improved, following all the useful comments and suggestions from the protracted consultation.

"Of course there were some difficult decisions to make for we received opposing views on several issues. We hope that the working party have managed to achieve the right balance."

Some of the major alterations include supporting a 20mph limits in the town centre and on new developments, support for any plans to improve Kenilworth's air quality, and continued support for a two-storey car park as long as electric vehicle charging points and bike parking is supported.

An entirely new policy on flooding has been added, which states that any scheme which reduces the risk of flooding in the town will be supported, and any which may increase risk will be resisted.

Other changes include firming up the protection to Castle Farm and its nearby residents, who are worried about the planned move to the site by Kenilworth Wardens.

Their concerns included whether public access to the site will be maintained and the likely increase in traffic.

The plan will now only support the Wardens move if all the facilities remain accessible to the public 'where possible', new traffic routes are backed up by a 'full traffic study' which will minimise disruption, and all new buildings and lighting are 'appropriate to the Green Belt location'.

There is also further support for green spaces in general. The plan now states any development which reduces public open space in the town will be resisted.

At the special meeting in March, councillors will decide whether the plan can be sent to Warwick District Council for approval. If the district council accepts the plan, it will then be sent to an independent inspector for approval.

After this, the plan will be put to residents in a yes or no referendum.

Once adopted, the Neighbourhood Plan will have strong weight on any planning applications in the town, along with the recently adopted Local Plan.

Anyone wishing to look at the latest version of the plan should visit Kenilworth Library or click here