Facing his Everest: Blind man from a south Warwickshire village is climbing nearby hill almost 200 times with his guide dog to raise money for three charities

David Adams of Priors Marston will turn 78 on August 8 when he aims to complete his final climb of Marston Hill with his dog Jimbo in aid of European Guide Dogs, the Motor Neurone Disease Association and Warwickshire Vision Support

Tuesday, 6th April 2021, 7:24 pm
Updated Wednesday, 7th April 2021, 2:27 pm

A blind man from Warwickshire and his guide dog are 'facing their Everest' by climbing the equivalent distance of reaching the summit of the world's highest mountain at a hill near his home in order to raise money for three different charities - including one supported by his late son.

David Adams, of Priors Marston, and his dog Jimbo will have climbed Marston Hill 197 times by August 8 when he turns 78.

David, with support from both Jimbo and his colleague and 'sherpa' Charlotte Paynter, of Napton, is raising funds for European Guide Dogs, the Motor Neurone Disease (MnD) Association and Warwickshire Vision Support.

David Adams on one of his many walks up Marton Hill with his dog Jimbo.

David's son Simon died of MnD in 2011 having lived his final days to the full, fighting to help find a cure for the devastating disease.David, who is the president of European Guide Dogs and a trustee for Warwickshire Vision Support, said: "So far we have climbed the hill 45 times since the beginning of March, which equates to a vertical accent of 2,000 m and 6,824 ft, higher than Ben Nevis and nearly a quarter of the way to the top of Everest.

"My knees, which are a bit wobbly, are holding up well and I've lost nearly 1kg of weight, which could explain it.

"In horizontal distance, we have walked 64 km which is equivalent to one-and-a-half marathons and this Arctic weather we're having feels as if we're half way up Everest already.

"So far our fundraising has reached just under £2,000, which will be shared between Warwickshire Vision Support, the European Guide Dog Federation, which supports 30,000 assistance/guide dogs and their disabled partners across Europe, and the Motor Neurone Disease Association, which carries out research for a terrible disease which has killed my son and several friends and acquaintances locally in the last few years."

David Adams on one of his many walks up Marton Hill with his dog Jimbo.
David Adams on one of his many walks up Marton Hill with his dog Jimbo.