Leamington woman has found new sense of purpose after the death of her husband by helping poor children in India

Rose Enstone with youngsters while she was helping at the Draram Raksha Welfare Society in Ludihana, India.
Rose Enstone with youngsters while she was helping at the Draram Raksha Welfare Society in Ludihana, India.
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Helping impoverished children in India has given a bereaved Leamington pensioner a “sense of purpose” after her husband died.

Rose Enstone, 71, of Kelvin Road, recently travelled to Ludhiana to stay with the Punjabi in-laws of her late husband Michael’s former carer Paul.

Rose Enstone with youngsters while she was helping at the Draram Raksha Welfare Society in Ludihana, India.

Rose Enstone with youngsters while she was helping at the Draram Raksha Welfare Society in Ludihana, India.

While she was there she helped at the Draram Raksha Welfare Society - a charity ran by Paul’s brother-in-law Raman Kumar.

Mrs Enstone said the trip and her experience has helped her to overcome her grief after Michael, who had dementia and heart problems, died aged 80 in 2015 after they had been married for 47 years.

She said; “I have a purpose now.

“I would spend a lot of time at home cleaning or just taking the dogs for a walk.

“But seeing those children living in such appalling conditions has made me want to raise awareness of their plight and raise money for donations.

“Michael and I never had any children of our own so I called the ones I met over there ‘my lovely children’.”

The society provides food, fresh water, clothing and medical assistance to the poorest children in Ludhiana.

It has more than 1,500 members and helpers work on a voluntary basis but it can cost up to £2,600 a month and £300 each time it provides this aid to the youngsters as the hiring of a cook and assistant is needed to cook and provide all the meals.

Mrs Enstone said she is hoping to go back to Ludhiana soon and in the meantime is asking friends for donations to the cause.

Mrs Enstone and Michael moved to Leamington 40 years ago and ran a packing business together before they retired in 1997.

She travelled to Ludhiana in April and wants to return in February, which will be around two years after Michael died.

A few years ago India accounted for one in three of the poor population worldwide with 30 per cent, or 224 million, there under the $1.90-a-day poverty measure, the World Bank said.

In May last year a report said it was ranked among the ten wealthiest countries in the world but that is largely due to its large population and on a per capita basis, the average Indian is quite poor.